Posts Tagged: Arches

Revisiting Double Arch

I’m just getting started processing the 1400+ images I came back with from Utah after my 4th of July trip.  On the trip, my love and I spent the nights camped along the Colorado River near Moab, Utah.  The mornings and evenings we spent in Arches National Monument.  We spent four days that way before moving on to Emery County to visit the old family farm and my Mother.

I’ve wanted to get back to Arches for well over a decade.  The last time I was in Arches my exploration of photography was still in its infancy.  I had managed to buy my first more-or-less serious digital camera (with a whopping 3 megapixels!) and felt I was ready for big-time success shooting in the park.

While at Double Arch in the Monument, I spent quite a bit of time climbing around looking for the right spot to shoot and taking mediocre photo after photo.  I did take one that I thought (at the time) was pretty good.  It wasn’t until I got home that I realized I had sunscreen on the lens and part of the image was fuzzy.  The whole thing turned into an exercise in frustration.

I still have a print of that photo in my library.  When I printed it, I thought it was an OK image (or at least the best I had taken) if you could ignore sunscreen smudge.  Now I just cringe and try to see it as an example of how far I’ve come.

In any event, on this trip it was important to me to shoot Double Arch at a number of different times of day and under different conditions with the hope of having at least some success while learning how to really photograph the arch.  Hence, I have quite a few photos of Double Arch I’m still working through.  In the mean time I wanted to share one from the set that I’ve finished so far.

In this case, I used HDR to compensate for the fact that the Arch was very backlit at the time I was shooting—not ideal conditions by any means.  The HDR technique made it possible for me to get this starburst image as the sun went down behind the arch.  I could not have realistically taken the photo in any other way—the dynamic range of the scene was just too wide for a camera to capture.

Comparing this image to the print I have from over a decade ago, I feel like I haven’t completely wasted my time.

If you like this version, check it out on my website.  You can order a print of your own here.